23 June 2021


Your PO Life Cycle GPS


CEOs, as well as supply chain and procurement managers, find it difficult to predict where the next "bottleneck" will be, which will disrupt the supply of parts, stop production lines and cause dissatisfaction with the end customers.

Industries which produce products especially if they are advanced or complex such as the automotive, aviation and electronic industries need to cope with a weakness: late delivery of parts. These industries produce products which contain many thousands of parts, and have to face the challenge of managing suppliers, inventory and production lines. Just like a puzzle is not complete if even one part out of a thousand is missing - so is an airplane that is missing a screw or an electronic device because that component's delivery was delayed by the supplier. The company may find itself with a product stuck on the assembly line without being able to continue production until the arrival of the long-awaited shipment. Beyond the financial damage in such a situation, it also means that the end customer will not receive his order at the appointed time - which could harm the company's reputation, credibility and profitability.

Many industries are by nature industries that are reactive instead of proactive, and procurement and supply chain managers will take action when parts are not being delivered on time. Only when the production line has stopped, because the parts have not been delivered in a timely manner will they start chasing after the suppliers and parts. The tools at the companies' disposal make it possible to identify the problem when it occurs, but it is too late.

How to Identify an item that might be delayed

So how can you change from being responsive to being able to look ahead and foretell the expected shortages. The answer is creating an algorithm that predicts which suppliers and what parts will be problematic. Today there is a whole world of ERP and MRP tools for scheduling and managing materials, and they do what is necessary, but ultimately they are all reactive - allow for a response only when the crisis is in its full swing. In fact, these are intra-organizational tools that do not address the suppliers' side. We have created a solution that combines the algorithm and the service that accompanies it to be proactive, controlling the situation in advance by early identification and handling of the problematic components before the status turns from green or yellow to red. The traffic lights are not just an image. The statuses of different parts are illustrated with these colors, allowing the user to easily identify an item that is in danger of being delayed. The algorithm analyzes information from a large number of sources and draws conclusions based on that. The algorithm weighs the data and draws a forecast, whether or not a part will arrive on time over the next three months. It relies on the supplier's supply history, the number of known parts he has in stock and production, his relevant purchase order confirmations, and finally his service index.

There might be an item that is due in two weeks and its supplier always meets the required delivery date. On the other hand, there is a required item for another two months - so the client is not dealing with it, but its supplier has an history of tardiness, a point the client is not necessarily aware of. The algorithm will paint that item in red so that the organization will take care of it in advance.

Identify the weak link in the chain

Essentially, this is a solution created by a combination of past, present and future. The algorithm takes past data, through the communication with the supplier and the present data - and based on this predicts the future. It paints the problematic items in red and tells the user:'Here's your problem, focus on it . 'Thus, organizations as well as supply chain and procurement managers are able to predict where the future "bottleneck" will be. The algorithm detects which parts will jam their assembly lines in advance, thus saving employees time that might have been wasted on having to recalculate a route. This solves a common problem of procurement people, who drown in information and deal with the search and solution of problems rather than preventing them in advance and enabling efficient and un interrupted work.

The use of such an algorithm will help any supply chain team by:

  • Ensuring suppliers On Time Delivery
  • Enhancing suppliers traceability and visibility
  • Effective suppliers risks management
  • Effortless suppliers communication
  • 05 May 2021


    The ROI of implementing Big Data analytics in daily Supply Management operations



    2020 has been in many respects the year of the supply chain, as all aspects of the function have been exposed and challenged and few businesses have emerged on affected. As we move through the myriad of 2020 supply disruptions, we understand that procurement has a supplier data problem, the side effects of which are costly and far-reaching.


    As supply risk continue and effective suppliers relationship management and assurance becomes even more challenging, as can be seen by recent 2021 research findings:

  • 41% of firms reported needing to expedite shipping to keep critical supply lines flowing
  • 36% losing revenue due to supply shortages
  • 11% realizing brand damages directly resulting from supplier issues
  • Only 26% can predict risks at their supply base
  • (Per the Deloitte Global 2021 Chief Procurement Officer Survey)


    So, what do we have to look forward and how can supply chain and procurement executives prepare for success? The solution might be found in investing time and resources to make sure that supply chain and procurement teams are empowered by a cleansed, harmonized, and enriched big data foundation.

    Big data is one of the most commonly discussed topics today, and many companies are attentively monitoring the evolution of this trend. Several studies have shown that managers are able to make the best decisions when armed with data and tools to gather insight . Researches report that a 15–20% increase in ROI can be achieved by introducing big data to enterprises’ business analytics.

    Traditionally, purchasing and supply management (PSM) has strongly relied on data management, as procurement managers need to dispose of, clean, and update data of different natures to compare suppliers’ performance and 20% to 50% of working time in procurement is related to searching for information Accordingly.


    Big data analytics have obvious applications and represents a new era in the PSM field as they link and aggregate all relevant information, thereby facilitating and speeding up strategic and operational procurement activities significantly, and are a critical source of meaningful information that can help supply chain stakeholders to gain improved insights and gain a competitive advantage and maximizing speed and visibility, improving supply chain relationships, and enhancing supply chain agility

    However, despite the relevance of data management, the PSM field has been relatively slow to identify the potential role of new technologies and businesses have been less quick to implement big data analytics in PSM than in other areas, such as marketing or manufacturing. Per a CPO: “Data have always been out there. Companies started to accumulate the data long ago, so the term ‘big data’ does not have a completely new meaning. However, in the last few years, the mentality of the buyer has changed; now he/she is aware of the fact that the data at his/her disposal can be employed to increase the efficiency of the procurement activity. In the past, due to a lack of technology, it was unthinkable to process the data. Today, it becomes possible, and several opportunities arise in the procurement process as well as in other departments.” (Increasing the effectiveness of procurement decisions: The value of big data in the procurement process Antonella M. Morettoa,∗, Stefano Ronchia and Andrea S. Patruccob")

    Few companies, however, have been able to apply... the "big analytics" techniques that could transform the way they define and manage their supply chains. In our view, the full impact of big data ... is restrained by two major challenges. First, there is a lack of capabilities. Supply chain managers—even those with a high degree of technical skill—have little or no experience with the data analysis techniques used by data scientists. As a result, they often lack the vision to see what might be possible with big data analytics. Second (and perhaps more significantly), most companies lack a structured process to explore, evaluate and capture big data opportunities in their supply chains. " (Big data and the supply chain: The big-supply-chain analytics landscape (Part 1) - Mckinsey February 16,2021")


    But once applying these technologies… “High performers are 4-5 times more likely to have fully deployed advanced analytics/visualization, … have fully deployed predictive analytics capabilities (12% vs. 0% for others), and are 18x more likely to have fully deployed AI/cognitive capabilities…Strong digital capabilities can help Procurement organizations improve data visibility and the ability to collaborate/synchronize with suppliers, enabling greater agility both within these organizations and across the extended supply networks. CPOs can work toward building use cases for the Internet of Things, 5G, blockchain, control towers, and collaborative workflows enabled by AI/machine learning to up their digital game in these areas.” (Per the Deloitte Global 2021 Chief Procurement Officer Survey)

    2 examples of how big data can be used in the daily procurement teams work:

    1.supplier lead time analysis: In most enterprise purchasing systems, supplier's lead times are entered upon supplier agreement signature and are kept as static data on a part level which is not updated frequently or at all. Since supplier lead time plays a critical role in the timing and sizing of purchase order decisions, many purchasing professionals have recognized this importance, and are looking to accurately predict lead times and to develop strategies for coping with problems created by lead time variations. As part of our ongoing work to develop prediction algorithms based on advanced analytical tools such as machine learning (ML) to help the supply chain organization better manage their suppliers, we've developed a module that predicts the lead time variation % of a supplier manufactured part compared to the current static lead time maintained in the enterprise purchasing system. This module analysis big data captured from various systems:

    • 1. Purchasing information from the enterprise system
    • 2. Goods received information from the enterprise system
    • 3. Daily supplier data captured in our systems: late lines, late qty
    • 4. Supplier portal inputs such as date difference in supplier PO confirmations

    Blending this wide range of information and sources helps build an accurate module and after training it, It helps build an accurate prediction system, which highlights the following to the supply chain organization:

    • 1. Fine-tune supplier's metrics to better predict if parts will be shipped on time or not.
    • 2. Specify lead time data on a part level which includes WIP (Work in process) and inventory qty recommendation for both buyers and suppliers.
    • 3. Return updated lead time to enterprise system to better manage the purchase order life cycle.

    2. predict suppliers' late deliveries: The use of advanced prediction algorithms to foresee your supplier's on-time parts delivery problems and not after they shut your lines down has a great positive impact on OTD performance. These prediction systems help set expectations and give supply chain managers the tools to make the right decisions for on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities, and focus on growth. We've based our PPA (parts prediction algorithm) on the analysis of 4 suppliers data inputs from various systems:

    • ✫ Historical inbound shipments Data from the ERP system
    • ✫ Manufacturing data via the suppliers portal
    • ✫ PO confirmations in the supplier portal
    • ✫ Supplier portal updating trends

    After studying and analyzing the big data gathered from the above systems, the algorithm provides a scoring system that is adjusted on a supplier level per the engagement level allocated to each supplier.

    This prediction system gives an indicator for manufactured parts at suppliers and gives supply chain managers the tools to communicate and make the right decisions to achieve on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities and focus on growth and not resolving delivery issues.

    This is of huge potential benefit to manufacturing companies, especially those that rely on just-in-time component and materials delivery, and will improve OTD rates and assemble lines shutdowns with the costs associated with such problems.

    5 Ways Big Data in Procurement Can Improve Your Bottom Line

    Big data analytics is playing an instrumental role in improving suppliers management. It resolves several pain points at strategic, operational, and tactical levels. Big data is making an impact on all supply chain activities. It ranges from improving delivery times to identifying ways to reduce the communication gap between manufacturers and suppliers.

    A recent survey revealed a staggering number of critical issues that organizations are dealing with as a result of poor supplier data. Probably the most shocking result was that 93% of procurement and supply chain leaders had experienced adverse effects of misinformation about their suppliers, and nearly half (47%) experience such negative effects on a regular basis. consequences include wasted time (63%), delays in projects (47%), and worse, terminated supplier relationships.

    Here are five ways big data can really improve your bottom line:

    1. Fact-based decision-making: With Big Data, fact-based decision-making has a chance to become ubiquitous reality. We all know that critical business issues are often discussed anecdotally. With a Big Data approach, procurement executives could consistently ask for data-oriented evidence for all major decisions and reported business issues, such as quality problems.

    2. supplier knowledge - In the past, organizations faced laborious processes that took several weeks to gather internal and structural data from the operations and transactions of the company and its partners. But today, at a significant speed, in real-time, in many cases, all of the diverse structural, nonstructural, internal, and external data generated from automated processes are made available to these organizations. Basing supplier selection, monitoring, and control on more data and information will improve procurement performance at the supplier level. As mentioned above, the main benefit is cost reduction.

    3. suppliers’ performance - The adoption of big data in the procurement process improves suppliers’ performance mainly in terms of cost but also potentially in terms of time, quality, innovation, flexibility, and sustainability

    4. Increase Savings by Learning More About Suppliers - Ideally, you would constantly monitor each supplier to verify that their operational performance is up to par, their bottom line is stable and healthy, their product is of consistent quality, and their sourcing meets compliance standards. Ongoing supplier analysis can capture every detail, flag every anomaly, and verify every transaction to show you whether your suppliers are performing as expected. This will help you determine how much you stand to save or risk by switching to another supplier or ordering from a different region of the world.

    5. Predictive Analysis - One of the biggest advantages of embracing big data analytics within your organization is that it creates the ability to become predictive rather than reactive so activities from strategizing for supply, the selection of suppliers, the management of supplier relationships, and ordering and expedition – has been claimed to have huge potential in benefiting from big data (BD) . A recent Hackett report found that world-class organizations that take advantage of procurement technology are more efficient, with 22% lower labor costs and 29% fewer full-time equivalents (FTEs) than typical organizations.

    28 March 2021


    How companies can predict suppliers' late deliveries with the use of advanced analytics and a systematic approach



    In the second part of our "Advanced suppliers analytics - turning data into insights" series, we will show how companies can predict suppliers' late deliveries with the use of advanced analytics and a systematic approach.

    Poor on-time delivery (OTD) performance from suppliers impacts more than customers. It’s also an indicator of poor production efficiency and materials handling procedures. Consistent OTD problems can negatively affect many other areas of a company’s supply chain. Imagine the impact of a material shortage on the production process, the delayed schedules, and the extra labor costs for waiting. Not to mention costs of amending production lines, extra shipping, and addressing a flood of customer complaints.


    While most supply chain organizations strive for 99% OTD from suppliers, most will be around 80-85% at best. Here’s a look at OTD performance per the American Productivity and Quality Center (APQC): Average weekly supplier's transactions


    The use of advanced prediction algorithms to foresee your supplier's on-time parts delivery problems and not after they shut your lines down has a great positive impact on OTD performance.


    These prediction systems help set expectations and give supply chain managers the tools to make the right decisions for on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities, and focus on growth.


    We've based our PPA (parts prediction algorithm) on the analysis of 4 suppliers data inputs from various systems:
    ✫ Historical inbound shipments Data from the ERP system
    ✫ Manufacturing data via the suppliers portal
    ✫ PO confirmations in the supplier portal
    ✫ Supplier portal updating trends


    After studying and analyzing the big data gathered from the above systems, the algorithm provides a scoring system that is adjusted on a supplier level per the engagement level allocated to each supplier and the score is grouped into 3 main levels:


    ✫ Red < 65 (parts are late or will be late in the next 90 days - Need immediate attention)

    ✫ Yellow > 65 <85 (parts have a chance to be late in the next 90 days – Need some attention)

    ✫ Green > 85 (parts will be on time in the next 90 days)


    This prediction system gives an indicator for manufactured parts at suppliers and gives supply chain managers the tools to communicate and make the right decisions to achieve on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities and focus on growth and not resolving delivery issues.


    This is of huge potential benefit to manufacturing companies, especially those that rely on just-in-time component and materials delivery, and will improve OTD rates and assemble lines shutdowns with the costs associated with such problems.


    Join our upcoming Wednesday 07 April 2021 10:00 am pst webinar "Advanced Suppliers Analytics - a how-to guide" to learn more about how you can use advanced suppliers analytics to fine-tune your supplier's performance and achieve higher on-time delivery rates. Click here for more details

    21 March 2021


    Your daily communication with your suppliers generates big data. Advanced analytics can turn that data into real insights and generate cost savings



    Advanced Analytics (The autonomous or semi-autonomous examination of data or content using sophisticated techniques and tools, typically beyond those of traditional business intelligence (BI), to discover deeper insights, make predictions, or generate recommendations. Advanced analytic techniques include those such as data/text mining, machine learning, pattern matching, forecasting, visualization…) starts from datasets that are available in your ERP, supplier portals, or any other supplier communication tools you may use. Advanced analytics does not need to be complex nor is it designed to be used only by big organizations. With the right supporting technology and introduction, you also can get intuitive insights, visualize outcomes or use a predictive model to gain insight into your supplier's performance and readiness to meet your demands.

    "Few companies, however, have been able to apply... the "big analytics" techniques that could transform the way they define and manage their supply chains. In our view, the full impact of big data ... is restrained by two major challenges. First, there is a lack of capabilities. Supply chain managers—even those with a high degree of technical skill—have little or no experience with the data analysis techniques used by data scientists. As a result, they often lack the vision to see what might be possible with big data analytics. Second (and perhaps more significantly), most companies lack a structured process to explore, evaluate and capture big data opportunities in their supply chains. " (Big data and the supply chain: The big-supply-chain analytics landscape (Part 1) - Mckinsey February 16,2021").

    Let's look at supplier lead time analysis as a practical example of the usage of advanced analytical tools to gain real insight into suppliers' performance.

    Supplier Lead Time is the amount of time that normally elapses between the time an order is received by a supplier and the time the order is shipped.

    In most enterprise purchasing systems, supplier's lead times are entered upon supplier agreement signature and are kept as static data on a part level which is not updated frequently or at all.

    Since supplier lead time plays a critical role in the timing and sizing of purchase order decisions, many purchasing professionals have recognized this importance, and are looking to accurately predict lead times and to develop strategies for coping with problems created by lead time variations.

    As part of our ongoing work to develop prediction algorithms based on advanced analytical tools such as machine learning (ML) to help the supply chain organization better manage their suppliers, we've developed a module that predicts the lead time variation % of a supplier manufactured part compared to the current static lead time maintained in the enterprise purchasing system. This module analysis big data captured from various systems:

    1. Purchasing information from the enterprise system

    2. Goods received information from the enterprise system

    3. Daily supplier data captured in our systems: late lines, late qty

    4. Supplier portal inputs such as date difference in supplier po confirmations

    Blending this wide range of information and sources helps build an accurate module and after training it, It helps build an accurate prediction system, which highlights the following to the supply chain organization:

    1. Fine-tune supplier's metrics to better predict if parts will be shipped on time or not.

    2. Specify lead time data on a part level which includes WIP (Work in process) and inventory qty recommendation for both buyers and suppliers.

    3. Return updated lead time to enterprise system to better manage the purchase order life cycle.

    In the second part of this article series, we will show how companies can predict suppliers' late deliveries with the use of advanced analytics and a systematic approach.

    Join our upcoming Wednesday 07 April 2021 10:00 am pst webinar "Advanced Suppliers Analytics - a how-to guide" to learn more about how you can use advanced suppliers analytics to fine-tune your supplier's performance and achieve higher on-time delivery rates. Click here for more details

    Average weekly supplier's transactions
    27 February 2021


    Using manual supplier management tools? Here’s why you may want to change

    The transition from a mail and Excel based supplier management approach will take a company from a reactive approach —always chasing your parts, past dues, line stoppages and suppliers —to a proactive methodology.

    This means you’ll see much less of:

    • Phone calls and emails to suppliers requesting order confirmation, checking delivery status, rescheduling to meet MRP
    • Intake of unnecessary inventory too soon
    • Admitting that supplier leadtimes need to be updated in MRP
    • Maintaining Excel spreadsheets and reports to share supplier delivery, shortages and hot lists
    • Escalations to leadership
    • Conference calls and WebEx meetings with suppliers
    • Paying expedite fees
    • SCM shortages, which are the main reason for missed deliveries to customers

    And much more of:

    • Transparency of Supplier open orders
    • Sharing the same PO information between MRP, supplier, buyer, planner and management
    • Predicting which suppliers will be On-Time In Full (OTIF) before delivery is missed
    • Knowing inventory levels at your supplier
    • Knowing the leadtime for every part
    • Accessing live order statuses from anywhere, at anytime
    • Reducing inventory levels
    • Cutting transportation costs
    • Lowering warehousing costs
    • Shortening lead times

    Organizations report that they saw major productivity and administrative cost benefits when they moved from phone, email and spreadsheet-based communications to electronic communications. They saw even more value when they also moved toward process collaborations, including lead-time reductions, improved customer service and significant revenue growth.

    27 February 2021 pic1
    (Per an Aberdeen group “B2B” Integration and collaboration: Strategies for building a ROI business case)
    27 February 2021 pic2

    So, it’s no surprise that in a recent Forrester Consulting Thought Leadership Paper, written after the COVID-19 outbreak and titled “Collaborate to Win Procurement’s Strategic Value Hinges On Enhanced Collaboration With Business Units And Suppliers”, one of the main recommendations is: “Implement supplier value management software to digitize collaboration. You need modern software that is easy for procurement to use and that facilitates collaboration with suppliers. Exchange and processing of formal documents such as purchase orders … should be fully digital; this is table stakes if you want suppliers to want to collaborate with you. In addition, your SVM software should streamline the flow of other types of information, such as schedule changes, revised delivery dates, and invoice queries.”

    At IDAS, we’re always working on thought leadership pieces to help us all prepare for the future. Join our monthly webinars to stay ahead of the curve in the supplier business and learn more on the ROI business case and the top benefits you can gain through advanced supplier collaboration. Register right here, right now, by clicking the following link

    17 February 2021


    Hard data reveals the hidden costs of manual supplier management using mail and Excel

    In this month's supplier management “How-to” series, we’ll answer the mounting questions in the ongoing debate over how a business case can be built to justify moving from a manual labor-intensive supplier management methodology to a technology and automated approach.:

    First, let’s take a look at the numbers::
    1. Average weekly supplier's transactions:
    Average weekly supplier's transactions

    (Per 2015 - Sharedserviceslink and PaymentWorks survey)

    2. Percentage of supplier transactions being managed manually:
    Average weekly supplier's transactions

    (Per an Aberdeen group “B2B” Integration and collaboration: Strategies for building a ROI business case)
    Average weekly supplier's transactions
    (Per The Route to Smarter Manfuacturing for SMES https://www.themanufacturer.com/reports-whitepapers/connected-and-intelligent-smarter-manufacturing-for-smes/

    The above figures make clear that many companies have a long way to go in taking advantage of modern communication and collaboration systems. They’re held back by in an internal belief that the manual methods they’ve been using for so many years are the best-in-class and benefit their business. But they are missing the point—big time.

    3. According to the Aberdeen group research, best-in-class companies receive 97% of orders from suppliers completely and on-time and they’re heavily involved in supplier collaboration technology initiatives and automation. Other organizations are behind in this parameter. Take On-Time Delivery (OTD), for example:

    (OTD performance per the American Productivity and Quality Center (APQC))

    4. Best-in-class companies are able to significantly lower the cost of different procurement and supplier-related transactions when moving to a technology-orientated collaboration methodology:

    (Per an Aberdeen group “B2B” Integration and collaboration: Strategies for building a ROI business case)

    The above numbers are quite obvious: organizations that are behind and still heavily dependent on manual mail and Excel based supplier collaboration methodologies are missing huge advantages and financial savings that can have a strong impact on ROI. Additional value can be gained by moving towards process collaboration including lead time reduction, improved customer service levels and top line revenue growth.

    So, it’s no surprise that in a recent Forrester Consulting Thought Leadership Paper, written after the COVID-19 outbreak and titled “Collaborate to Win Procurement’s Strategic Value Hinges On Enhanced Collaboration With Business Units And Suppliers”, one of the main recommendations is:

    “Implement supplier value management software to digitize collaboration. You need modern software that is easy for procurement to use and that facilitates collaboration with suppliers. Exchange and processing of formal documents such as purchase orders … should be fully digital; this is table stakes if you want suppliers to want to collaborate with you. In addition, your SVM software should streamline the flow of other types of information, such as schedule changes, revised delivery dates, and invoice queries.”

    At IDAS, we’re always working on thought leadership pieces to help us all prepare for the future. Join our monthly webinars to stay ahead of the curve in the supplier business and learn more on the ROI business case and the top benefits you can gain through advanced supplier collaboration. Register right here, right now, by clicking the following link



    17 January 2021


    How to Keep it Collaborative with Supplierss

    Achieving a healthy level of collaboration with suppliers is essential for a successful relationship. But in an ever-changing business landscape and world in general, it requires constant maintenance. Incorporating a few simple routines within your organization can ensure that your collaboration levels with suppliers stay as high as possible.

    This is our 6-step approach:
    1. Service
    Always be service orientated when deploying your supplier portal. Make sure you can be reached and stay responsive to supplier requests. From login to technical questions, quality service at every stage leads to higher supplier engagement and participation rates.
    2. Ease of Use
    Keep your portal as easy to use as possible for suppliers. Reduce the number of required inputs to the minimum needed, make validation messages crystal clear, and be sure there are no special technical requirements needed (such as software downloads) to use the portal.
    3. User-Friendly
    Be sure the GUI (Graphical user interface) is user-friendly and web-based, so those who already use other web pages and applications find it intuitive and familiar. Keep your portal mobile-friendly as well and include on-screen messages telling the user what needs to be done.
    4. Tutorials and Training
    Today, nearly all users are visual learners. Make use of online how-to videos rather than text tutorials. These videos should be as professional and detailed as possible. Also, offer in-depth training sessions when needed.
    5. Provide Both Incentives and Penalties
    Provide small incentives for regularly participating suppliers. And, in turn, enforce penalties to non-conforming ones. An small incentive example could be ensuring payments for supplies are consistently made on-time. Another would be communicating a supplier's importance to the accounting department, which can also avoid further disruption.
    6. Buyers and Administrators Buy In
    Make sure all ranks within the organization have bought into the portal deployment and understand the goals and KPI targets. Buyers and administrators are on the front lines, facing suppliers daily—they’re the ones that can convey the importance of portal usage to supplier contacts.

    At the end of the day, effective supplier collaboration can improve relationships with suppliers and deliver significant benefits including:
    • Transparency of supplier open orders
    • Shared PO information between MRP, supplier, buyer, planner, and management
    • Predictions of which suppliers will be On-Time In Full (OTIF) before delivery is missed
    • Knowing inventory levels at your supplier
    • Knowing the lead-time for every part
    • Accessing live order status from anywhere, at anytime
    • Improved supplier performance
    • Improved customer satisfaction
    • Cost-reduction of new parts development and lower inventory levels
    • Real-time, and better-informed business decisions


    These are just a few suggestions for keeping collaboration and overall relationships with suppliers in top shape. At IDAS, we’re always working on thought leadership pieces to help us all prepare for the future. Join our monthly webinars to stay ahead of the curve in the supplier business. Register right here, right now, by clicking the following link

    10 January 2021


    How to Set, and Achieve Collaboration Goals with Suppliers

    The quality of supplier collaboration can mean the difference between an efficient supply chain and poorly executed one. Improving this process can only start when there’s a strong commitment from supply chain partners to work as a team.

    Per Mckinsey & Company - Taking Supplier Collaboration to the Next Level (July 2020): "Companies with advanced procurement functions know that there are limits to the value they can generate by focusing purely on the price of the products and services they buy. These organizations understand that when buyers and suppliers are willing and able to cooperate, they can often find ways to unlock significant new sources of value that benefit them both.…work has shown that supplier collaboration really does move the needle for companies that do it well. In one McKinsey survey of more than 100 large organizations in multiple sectors, companies that regularly collaborated with suppliers demonstrated higher growth, lower operating costs, and greater profitability than their industry peers."

    In our 35 years of supplier management experience, we at IDAS, have learned that increasing visibility and traceability with suppliers is key. That’s why we put into practice the phrase we so much believe in: "Communication. Communication. Communication. Don’t tell them, show them.” When we provide support with action, we can help achieve better supplier collaboration.

    The first stage in achieving supplier collaboration is defining both strategic and tactical goals.

      Here are a few strategic goals:
    • Make your suppliers a strategic partner who can help create better competitive differentiators
    • Synchronize expectations to ensure the right materials are available at the right time and location
    • Drive synergy and create a holistic relationship

      Here are a few tactical goals:
    • Maintain required OTD levels
    • Maintain required PPM levels
    • Maintain flawless daily communication

    So how can you better collaborate with your suppliers in your workday?
    This is our 3-step approach:
    Step #1: Increase visibility and traceability with your suppliers by using online tools like user-friendly web supplier portals for on-time PO confirmations. This will also help communicate accurate changes in your requirements in real-time, enabling all sides to adjust to constantly changing demands during times of crisis.
    Step #2: Obtain accurate WIP (work-in-progress) and stock level quantities from your suppliers and manufacturers. This will help you identify and analyze any potential shortages that may lead to line stoppages while also immediately fulfill requirements that arise from your manufacturing sites when needed.
    Step #3: Share as much information with your suppliers as possible. Send forecasts, news updates, and accounts payable information with your supplier online. This will increase supplier participation rates and overall information sharing.

    At IDAS, we’re always working on thought leadership pieces to help us all prepare for the future. Join our monthly webinars to stay in-the-know!

    25 November 2020


    Predicting late deliveries. A “how-to” guide.

    Poor on-time delivery (OTD) performance from suppliers impacts more than customers. It’s also an indicator of poor production efficiency and materials handling procedures. Consistent OTD problems can negatively affect many other areas of a company’s supply chain. Imagine the impact of a material shortage on the production process, the delays schedules, and the extra labor costs for waiting. Not to mention costs of amending production lines, extra shipping, and addressing a flood of customer complaints.

    One way to improve OTD is by building strong relationships and collaboration with suppliers. Per Mckinsey & Company - Taking supplier collaboration to the next level (July 2020): "…work has shown that supplier collaboration really does move the needle for companies that do it well. In one McKinsey survey of more than 100 large organizations in multiple sectors, companies that regularly collaborated with suppliers demonstrated higher growth, lower operating costs, and greater profitability than their industry peers."

    While most supply chain organizations strive for 99% OTD from suppliers, most will be around 80-85% at best. Here’s a look at OTD performance per the American Productivity and Quality Center (APQC):

    In our 35 years in supplier management, we at IDAS have learned that Increasing visibility and traceability with suppliers using online tracking tools and PO confirmations via supplier portals (putting to practice the phrase we so much believe in " Communication. Communication. Communication. - Don’t tell them, show them") And analyzing big data gathered from this communication with your suppliers by the use of advanced prediction algorithms can help you prepare for parts delivery problems ahead of time.

    These prediction systems help set expectations and give supply chain managers the tools to make the right decisions for on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities, and focus on growth.

    The benefits are huge, especially for those that rely on just-in-time component and materials delivery, will improve OTD rates and reduce assembly line shutdowns. Our system can be integrated with any ERP system, and ready to go live in just four weeks, all at an affordable rate.

    At IDAS, we’re always working on thought leadership pieces to help us all prepare for the future. Be sure to join our monthly webinars to stay ahead of the curve in the supplier business. Don’t miss our Wednesday 9 December 10:00 am PST webinar, "Predicting late deliveries. A “how-to” guide". Register right here, right now. Click here to register!

    November 2020


    The cost of suppliers late deliveries & poor OTD

    Poor supplier's on-time delivery (OTD) performance impacts more than customers it’s usually an indicator of poor production efficiency and materials handling procedures. Consistent problems with supplier's on-time delivery can cause issues that affect many other areas of a company’s supply chain. Just imagine the impact of a material shortage on your production process, the delays this causes to the end product and to the manufacturing schedule, the extra labor costs involved in waiting time, the costs of amending the production line, the extra shipping costs, and not forgetting the impending floods of customer complaints.

    One way to improve supplier's OTD is by building strong relationships and collaboration with suppliers – Per Mckinsey & Company - Taking supplier collaboration to the next level (July 2020): "work has shown that supplier collaboration really does move the needle for companies that do it well. In one McKinsey survey of more than 100 large organizations in multiple sectors, companies that regularly collaborated with suppliers demonstrated higher growth, lower operating costs, and greater profitability than their industry peers."

    In our 35 years of supplier management experience, we've learned that the use of advanced prediction algorithms to foresee your supplier's on-time parts delivery problems in advance and not after they shut your lines down has a great positive impact on OTD performance.

    Such a prediction system gives an indicator for manufactured parts at suppliers and gives supply chain managers the tools to communicate and make the right decisions to achieve on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities, and focus on growth and not resolving delivery issues.

    This is of huge potential benefit to manufacturing companies, especially those that rely on just-in-time component and materials delivery and will improve OTD rates and assemble lines shutdowns with the costs associated with such problems.

    Our system can be integrated with any ERP system, implemented and ready to go live in 4 weeks and with a very competitive and budgetary pricing!

    Join our November webinar to learn more about how "Can you predict suppliers late deliveries?". In this webinar we will talk about our prediction algorithm, methodology and how can you apply it you’re your suppliers and business logic. Click here to register!

    November 2020


    Can you predict suppliers late deliveries?

    While most supply chain organizations strive for 99% on-time delivery (OTD) from suppliers, the reality is a bit more complex and OTD in many cases will be around 80-85% for manufacturing organizations with best of class supply chain teams and methodology.
    OTD performance per the American Productivity and Quality Center (APQC):

    So we raise the question - can you predict suppliers late deliveries in advance, allowing a proactive supplier management methodology which will help improve OTD, enabling supply chain managers to mitigate risks of disruptions to production flows and reduce the costs that these can cause.

    The answer is "Yes"!

    The use of advanced AI and ML algorithms to analyze suppliers’ data is the way to go.

    We've built such an algorithm based on 4 main suppliers data inputs from various systems:

  • Historical inbound shipments Data from the ERP system
  • Manufacturing data via the suppliers portal
  • PO confirmations in the supplier portal
  • Supplier portal updating trends
  • After studying and analyzing the big data gathered from the above systems, the algorithm provides a scoring system which is adjusted on a supplier level per the engagement level allocated to each supplier:

  • Suppliers that input Stock + WIP data
  • Suppliers that input Stock data
  • Suppliers that don’t input manufacturing data (Only PO confirmations)
  • The score is grouped into 3 main levels:

  • Red < 65 (parts are late or will be late in the next 90 days - Need immediate attention)
  • Yellow > 65 <85 (parts have a chance to be late in the next 90 days – Need some attention)
  • Green > 85 (parts will be on time in the next 90 days)
  • This prediction system gives an indicator for manufactured parts at suppliers and gives supply chain managers the tools to communicate and make the right decisions to achieve on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities, and focus on growth and not resolving delivery issues.

    This is of huge potential benefit to manufacturing companies, especially those that rely on just-in-time component and materials delivery and will improve OTD rates and assemble lines shutdowns with the costs associated with such problems.

    Our system can be implemented and ready to go live in 4 weeks!

    Join our November webinar to further understand how "Can you predict suppliers late deliveries?".

    October 2020
    Sixth, in our series on suppliers management how-to, we will look at ways to control inbound supplier's shipments, which help keep inventory levels and cash flow under control:


    Own Your Inbound Shipments

    The costs of excess inventory can be huge: These may include freight in, storage costs, insurance expenses, external or internal theft, obsolescence, spoilage, and taxes. Studies have shown that the annual additional cost of holding excess inventory can be 25 percent to 32 percent.The bottom line: The more inventory you have on hand, the greater the amount of the business’ capital is tied up. One way to control excess inventory and try to optimize it is by eliminating early supplier's shipments.

    We suggest the following approach for controlling suppliers inbound shipments:


    1. Utilize a Simple workflow for authorizing all supplier shipments in advance. This will help keep inventory levels and cash flow under full control. Create a simple workflow for this process >> Suppliers confirm PO lines in a supplier portal as "Ready for shipment" (Only lines within the shipment window will be visible and allow to confirm as "Ready for shipment") >> Buyers receive an email alert and approve >> Suppliers receive authorization to create barcodes and shipment paperwork.

    2. Go paperless by adding online barcoding and shipment paperwork (COC, FAI) capabilities so that suppliers can create this online and on the fly, you gain full visibility and control of the shipment in advance and your incoming inspection won’t have to deal with endless paperwork and the risk associated with it in our current environment.

    Join us Wednesday, Oct 21 at 10:00 AM EST for a live 30 minutes webinar to learn how you also can "Own your inbound shipments".
    https://www.gotomeet.me/peter989/how-can-you-protect-budgets
    You can also dial in using your phone:
    United States: +1 (872) 240-3412
    Access Code: 285-138-669

    September 2020
    Fifth, in our series on suppliers management how-to, we will continue looking at AI (Artificial Intelligence) and ML (Machine Learning) implementations for suppliers management:


    Machine Learning modules for Supplier Lead time management

    Supplier Lead Time is the amount of time that normally elapses between the time an order is received by a supplier and the time the order is shipped.

    In most enterprise purchasing systems, suppliers lead time are entered upon supplier agreement signature and are kept as static data on a part level which is not updated frequently or at all.

    Since supplier lead time plays a critical role in the timing and sizing of purchase order decisions, many purchasing professionals have recognized this importance, and are looking to accurately predict lead times and to develop strategies for coping with problems created by lead time variations.

    As part of our ongoing work to develop prediction algorithms based on AI and ML to help the supply chain organization better manage their suppliers, we've developed a module which predicts the lead time variation % of a supplier manufactured part compared to the current static lead time maintained in the enterprise purchasing system.

    This module combines data captured from various systems:
    1. Purchasing information from the enterprise system
    2. Goods received information from the enterprise system
    3. Daily supplier data captured in our systems: late lines, late qty
    4. Supplier portal inputs such as date difference in supplier po confirmations

    Blending this wide range of information and sources, helps build an accurate module and after training it, It helps build an accurate prediction system, which highlights the following to the supply chain organization:
    1. Fine-tune suppliers metrics to better predict if parts will be shipped on time or not.
    2. Specify lead time data on a part level which includes WIP (Work in process) and inventory qty recommendation for both buyers and suppliers.
    3. Return updated lead time to enterprise system to better manage the purchase order life cycle.

    September 2020
    Fourth, in our series on supplier's management how-to, we will look at using AI for suppliers management.


    AI for suppliers management - From Reactive to Proactive

    PricewaterhouseCoopers determined that Artificial Intelligence (AI) "is a source of both huge excitement and apprehension. What are the real opportunities and threats for your business?...Business leaders are asking: What impact will AI have on my organization, ... And these leaders look to capitalize on AI opportunities..."

    Supply chain and suppliers management methods are at a significant point in time where the adoption of AI- and ML (Machine learning) enabled solutions could mean the difference between failure and success.

    One major aspect that AI and ML algorithms can be of major help to supply chain and procurement teams is analyzing suppliers’ data and foresee on-time delivery issues in advance —before they stop production lines. These predictions can help target future critical suppliers and parts and enable procurement organizations to focus immediate attention on where it is most needed.

    We've built such an algorithm based on 4 main suppliers inputs from various systems:
    1. Historical inbound shipments Data
    2. Manufacturing data via the suppliers portal
    3. PO confirmations in the supplier portal
    4. Supplier portal updating trends

    The score is adjusted on a supplier level per the engagement rate allocated to each supplier:
    · Suppliers that input Stock + WIP data
    · Suppliers that input Stock data
    · Suppliers that don’t input manufacturing data (Only PO confirmations)

    And the outcome is grouped into 3 main colors:
    1. Red < 65 (Are late or will be late in the next 90 days - Need immediate attention)
    2. Yellow > 65 <85 (Have a chance to be late in the next 90 days – Need some attention)
    3. Green > 85 (Will be on time in the next 90 days)

    Such a prediction system will give indicators for manufactured parts at suppliers, and give the tools to communicate and make the right decisions to achieve on-time deliveries, eliminate hidden factory costs of late parts, redeploy labor from expediting to value-added activities, and focus on growth and not resolving delivery issues.

    September 2020
    Third, in our series on supplier's management how-to, we will look at using advanced technologies for the new normal.


    Digitizing Procurement For The New Normal

    Per Mckinsey August 2020 article, Reimagining procurement for the next normal: “Companies have a lot to bounce back from…Yet procurement has helped companies weather global crises before. According to our research, in the five years immediately following the 2008 global financial crisis (GFC), total return to shareholders (TRS) for companies with top-quartile procurement capabilities was 42 percent higher than for companies whose procurement operations were in the bottom quartile…We also found that companies with top-performing procurement functions saw valuations return to pre-GFC levels an average of three years faster…”

    Per the Mckinsey article, one of the five steps that will help procurement leaders address the current situation and set up their organizations for success is: “Accelerate adoption of digital and analytics: Procurement leaders have talked about digitizing procurement for some time. But our discussions with them indicate that progress has been slow. Many are trapped in pilot purgatory, making small investments in select use cases that never scale up to achieve real business impact. The rapid adoption of new ways of working that the pandemic necessitated forced companies to accelerate the shift to digital. As remote work becomes the next normal, digitization can be an important enabler of effective collaboration across functions.”

    We believe one immediate and budgetary digitizing procurement initiative can be using online tools like simple to use user-friendly web supplier portals built to help SCM teams better track suppliers open PO's and manufactured parts by allowing suppliers to update data in an easy, simple and fast secured web portal. to increase visibility and traceability with your suppliers for on-time PO confirmations and Obtaining accurate lead times, WIP (work-in-progress) and stock level quantities weekly.

    The second phase of such an initiative will be the use of advanced artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) algorithms to analyse suppliers’ data inputs gathered from the supplier portal over time. This will help foresee issues in advance and can play a major rule in the new normal and the efforts of procurement and supply chain teams to help their companies bounce back and will help companies target future critical suppliers and parts and enable them to focus immediate attention where it is most needed, thus redeploying labor from expediting to value added activities , eliminating hidden factory costs of late parts and focus on growth and not resolving delivery issues.

    September 2020
    Second, in our series on supplier's management how-to, we will look at the key factors on how to gain and maintain supplier's engagement and participation.


    How to gain and maintain supplier's engagement and participation

    Some of the biggest frustration with supplier portal tools implementation is the low percentage of supplier participation. Participation rates may fall under 50% of all participating suppliers, a figure that puts the entire investment and work at jeopardize.

    Here are some points to create supplier engagement strong:

    1. Service

    Be service orientated when deploying your supplier portal and make sure to be reachable and responsive to your supplier requests. From login to technical questions. Service = Higher supplier engagement and participating rates.

    2. Ease of use

    keep your portal as easy to use as possible for your suppliers. Be sure to reduce the number of supplier's required inputs to the minimum needed, make validation messages crystal clear and be sure that no special technical requirements are needed (such as software downloads) to use the portal.

    3. User friendly

    Be sure that the GUI (Graphical user interface) is user friendly and web-based, so users who are already using other web pages and applications, find it intuitive with same logic as in other web applications they daily use. Be sure that your portal is mobile friendly as well and use on screen messages telling the user what is needed to be done.

    5. Tutorials and training

    Make use of web videos instead of text tutorials. Make the tutorials as professional as possible and as detailed as possible. Offer detailed training sessions when neededץ

    6. Provide both incentives and penalties

    Provide small incentives for regularly participating suppliers and enforce penalties with non-conforming ones.

    7. Buyers and Administrators Buy In

    Be sure the all ranks inside the organization have bought into the portal deployment and understand the goals and KPI’s targets. The buyers and administrators are the ones facing suppliers daily and are the ones that can help convey the importance of the portal usage to the supplier contacts.

    When we deploy our IDAS.AI set of suppliers management tools, we take all of the above into consideration in order to ensure suppliers engagement rates remain higher over time (our benchmark is 70% monthly and between 75%- 85% 3 months rolling) and this is one example of a mail we received from one participating supplier:

    "WOW! That is all I can say. You were the easiest company to request portal access EVER!!!!! Thank you very much!"
    August 2020
    We are starting a series of professional weekly posts on supplier's management how-to. Feel free to comment and share and to raise any questions or subjects of interest. Our first post will deal with obtaining suppliers visibility and traceability


    Why do companies need to ensure suppliers visibility?

    Suppliers visibility is the ability of parts, components, or products to be tracked from the manufacturer to their final destination, and help to improve and strengthen the supply chain by making data readily available to all stakeholders, both within the suppliers and customer

    Fact #1:

    Supply chain visibility is now the third greatest strategic priority for industry professionals according to the GEODIS 2017

    Fact #2:

    Just 6% have "full visibility" into their tier-two suppliers. Cost is the likely reason for the lack of visibility, as not all companies have the resources to investigate their tier-three, four or five suppliers.

    Fact #3:

    Statistics demonstrate that only about 50% of organizations that are deemed "best-in-class" are using a supplier portal, and of the rest of the organizations, only 20% utilize supplier portals

    Problem #1:

    Supply chain and procurement managers, find it difficult to predict where the next "bottleneck" will be, which will disrupt the supply of parts, stop production lines and cause dissatisfaction with the end customers

    Problem #2:

    Suppliers compliance and po acknowledgments percentages are low and enormous amount of time=money is spent in communication with non-compliant suppliers

    Problem #3:

    Data silos are created and accessible by only one functionality/department but isolated from the rest of the supply chain. This results in a severe lack of transparency and efficiency.


    3 steps suppliers visibility development path:

    Step #1:

    Increase visibility and traceability with your suppliers by using online tools like simple to use user-friendly web supplier portals for on-time PO confirmations. This will also help flow down accurate changes in your requirements in real-time, enabling all sides to adjust to ever-changing demands in times of crisis.

    Step #2:

    Obtain accurate WIP (work-in-progress) and stock level quantities from your suppliers and manufacturers. This will help you analyze potential shortages that may lead to line stoppages in advance. It will also help you to fulfill immediate requirements arising from your manufacturing sites when needed

    Step #3:

    Share as much information with your suppliers. Share forecasts, news updates, and accounts payable information with your supplier on line. This will buy-in and increase supplier's participation rates and information sharing.

    The bottom line - Be traceable-Don’t tell them, show them!

    July 2020
    How can you protect budgets during COVID19?

    Today, more than ever, Supply chain teams need to keep a close watch on their bottom lines. At IDAS, we’re making that easier than ever by helping our clients keep their operations as simple and streamlined as possible. Our software and services help you:.

    Own your inbound shipments

    Suppliers confirm PO lines as “Ready for Shipment” in a supplier portal so you can Authorize all shipments early, to control cashflow and inventory

    Keep that workflow simple

    Increase visibility and traceability with online tracking tools and PO confirmations

    Ready. Set. Go paperless. - Paperless is more

    Online barcoding and shipment paperwork keep things simple and eco-friendly. Our supplier portal includes barcode shipping label that will inform that a package is being ready to ship, and force standardized shipping labels for incoming goods.

    These are tough times. Hard workers deserve an easy way to protect their budgets. Learn more about how you can simplify your processes and save money at IDAS.ai
    April 2020
    It’s time to rethink your supplier's management strategy

    The COVID-19 pandemic has rattled the world economy. With worldwide stay home policies and travel stoppage, hidden weaknesses in supply chains are surfacing and making it extremely difficult to minimize line stoppages, past dues, and communication breakdowns with your suppliers.

    It’s time to rethink your supplier's management strategy and introduce cutting-edge online tools that can help minimize performance and communication issues in the upcoming months.

    Here are a couple of points we are raising that might help you better manage your suppliers in these uncertain days:

    1. Increase visibility and traceability with your suppliers by using online tools like supplier portals for on-time PO confirmations. This will also help flow down accurate changes in your requirements in real time, enabling all sides to adjust to ever-changing demands in times of crisis.

    2. Obtain accurate WIP (work-in-progress) and stock level quantities from your suppliers and manufacturers. This will help you analyse potential shortages that may lead to line stoppages in advance. It will also help you to fulfil immediate requirements arising from your manufacturing sites when needed.

    3. Control inbound shipments by authorizing all supplier shipments in advance. This will help keep inventory levels and cash flow under your full control.

    Create a simple workflow for this process >> Suppliers confirm PO lines in a supplier portal as "Ready for shipment" >> Buyers receive an email alert and approve >> Suppliers receive authorization to create barcodes and shipment paperwork.

    4. Go paperless by adding online barcoding and shipment paperwork (COC, FAI) capabilities so that suppliers can create this online and on the fly, and your incoming inspection won’t have to deal with endless paperwork and the risk associated with it in our current environment.

    5. Prepare an updated contact list of suppliers and incorporate online tools to send real-time online notifications and alerts seamlessly and effortlessly. This will save your administrator the time and effort required to send hundreds of emails manually and let them focus on value-added work with their suppliers.

    6. In times when most administrative staff are working remotely through email at home, create a secured online communication platform by using timelines and agreed-upon graphical icons to centralize communication with suppliers and avoid issues of limited access to suppliers’ information.

    7. Map your suppliers, and use heat maps to get a clear, simple visualization of where your bottlenecks are and act accordingly. Map suppliers per different risk categories, which include geo-location and current readiness to deal with the pandemic.

    Heat Maps are extremely versatile and efficient in drawing attention to trends, and they are innately self-explanatory, with the ability to rapidly communicate key data insights to the viewer.

    8. Use advanced artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) to analyse suppliers’ data and foresee issues in advance —before they stop your production lines. These predictions will help you target future critical suppliers and parts and enable you to focus immediate attention where it is most needed.

    9. Stop being reactive >> Start being proactive by using online tools and predictive algorithms.

    March 2020
    Using heat maps to visualize suppliers risks

    When you hear the term “Heat Maps”, what comes to mind? Do you immediately think of something related to financials?



    By definition, Heat Maps are graphical representations of data that utilize color-coded systems. The primary purpose of Heat Maps is to better visualize the volume of locations/events within a dataset and assist in directing viewers towards areas on data visualizations that matter most.

    But they’re much more than that. What many people don’t realize, is that Heat Maps can be applied to a handful of data visualizations. This is especially true when dealing with large volumes of data, as colors are easier to distinguish and make sense of than raw numbers. Heat Maps are extremely versatile and efficient in drawing attention to trends, and Heat Maps are innately self-explanatory with the ability to rapidly communicate key data insights to the viewer. That’s the reason we're starting to introduce a variety of heat maps in our supplier management tools: from an overview and comparison of all suppliers to easily track suppliers with current and upcoming delivery and capacity issues to supplier-specific heat maps to view supplier trends in the last 6 months and from their a drill down on specific part numbers.

    Heat Maps

    February 2020
    In times of uncertainty, its time to stop being reactive and start being PROACTIVE!

    Learn how IDAS ground breaking technology, support and know how will help you minimize line stoppages, past dues and communication break down in times of uncertainty and travel stoppages.

    The spread of the coronavirus has rattled the world economy and with growing concerns of worldwide travel stoppages, its time to rethink your supplier's management strategy and introduce cutting edge on-line tools that can help minimize performance and communication issues in the upcoming months.


    Our unique combination of AI technology and accumulated experience will help you optimize your suppliers performance and communication issues in advance through identification of on-time delivery issues prior to them occurring, transparent real-time communications, elimination of non value-added operations, increasing accountability, 360-degree visibility across the whole supply base which eliminates the immediate need for on-site visits.

    Technology

    IDAS Unique integration of cutting-edge technology based on a proven worldwide communication tool and the next generation of parts prediction algorithm or PPA.

    Supplier Portals

    The Supply chain set of tools were built to help SCM teams better track suppliers open PO's and manufactured parts by allowing suppliers to update data in an easy, simple and fast secured web portal. The tools which include the Supplier Portal, Supplier Shipments and parts tracking ,will streamline the flow of information between suppliers and SCM teams there by increasing visibility, traceability and giving you the tools to communicate and take the right decisions to achieve on time deliveries.

    Supplier Open Orders Confirmation

    Create Shipments Documents

    Manufacturing Updates

    Parts Prediction Application (PPA)

    We take pride in our ground-breaking PPA Algorithm which allows supply chain teams to assess and measure suppliers data and activity over time. This includes historical and current acknowledgments, manufacturing, and shipping trends and data. PPA offers a prediction system and indicator for your manufactured parts at your suppliers, allowing you to make the appropriate decisions and to manage and guarantee on-time delivery.

    Supplier main page

    P/N main page

    P/N time line page

    Line of Balance (LOB)

    Our LOB Service will help you address the question of how aligned is supplier specific parts production with your demand. Save time , money and resources currently allocated to contacting and managing your suppliers, with our on line automatic and on site capabilities.

     

    Line of Balance

    Heat Maps

    With a simple view, our heat maps will help any supply chain team better understand where the bottle necks are located. If its on all suppliers, specific commodities or projects or on a part basis, save time and efforts analyzing your issues and start being proactive and work immediately to solve the upcoming performance and communication failures.

     

    Heat Maps